What fuels Shalane Flanagan: eat to run fast

What fuels you to run fast? Everyday we are faced with the age-old question: what do you want to eat? Many couples and families alike struggle to find the answer to this question but most people tend to try to eat healthy. But what is healthy? Everyone is different, but today I’m going to focus…

What fuels Shalane Flanagan: eat to run fast was originally published on Self Evolve

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What fuels you to run fast?

Everyday we are faced with the age-old question: what do you want to eat? Many couples and families alike struggle to find the answer to this question but most people tend to try to eat healthy. But what is healthy? Everyone is different, but today I’m going to focus on the super fast marathon runners and what they eat to fly. With the Chicago Marathon 2018 coming up, I feel it’s fitting to share a few recipes from a new cookbook coming out August 4th from NYC Marathon winner Shalane Flanagan. Read on in order to run fast.

Thai Quinoa Salad

This is a great healthy version of the beloved Thai salad. It’s hearty with quinoa, and you can add in fresh grilled steak. It had the complex carbohydrates needed to full you prior to race day. Full recipe can be found here.

Turkey Trot Meatballs

run fastEasy to make and packed full of protein, these turkey meatballs are the way to go. You can make a lot of them and have them around for awhile. You can dress them up or down. Add them to your salad or in rice bowls. Full recipe can be found here.

Red raspberry beet smoothie bowl

This is a great option for pre and post-run. Beets are good for your cardiovascular system since they lower blood pressure. Oats are a great option for easy-to-digest carbohydrates that provide energy for running. Full recipe can be found here.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

Reese’s are delicious but unfortunately full of sugar and hydrogenated oils, which are really bad for you. These are just as rich but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients. All whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Store these in the freezer for a yummy cold treat. Full recipe can be found here.

Pre-order the cookbook today!

 

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What fuels Shalane Flanagan: eat to run fast was originally published on Self Evolve

Find your power: get explosive by adding plyometrics

Get plyometric! Jumping isn’t only for basketball players. The right explosive exercises can help make your next run feel lighter and faster than ever. Most runners think about speed work, hills, and strength training to improve their run times, but often overlook adding power. Adding plyometrics- explosive, energy-honing exercises- to your training can make your…

Find your power: get explosive by adding plyometrics was originally published on Self Evolve

Get plyometric!

Jumping isn’t only for basketball players. The right explosive exercises can help make your next run feel lighter and faster than ever. Most runners think about speed work, hills, and strength training to improve their run times, but often overlook adding power. Adding plyometrics- explosive, energy-honing exercises- to your training can make your usual miles feel like you’ve switched to warp-speed mode. Plyometrics help convert strength into speed and explosive power.

What is it?

“Plyometrics involve a fast, high-intensity, involuntary eccentric contraction of the muscles and tendons, followed by an immediate, powerful concentric contraction,” Adam Rosante, strength and performance coach and founder of the Montauk Barbell Club. There are a lot of exercises that may look plyometric (i.e. box jumps, squat jumps, jumping lunges) but don’t fit the true definition. In order for it to be considered plyo, it has to be executed in less than two-tenths of a second. This is the amount of time in which your body can experience the shock that elicits the involuntary stretch, and use the accumulated energy for the returned action. The key to doing this well is a small number of good reps.

Slash seconds off your time

Studies show that just a month of performing traditional, resistance, or assisted plyo programs two to three times a week cuts seconds off sprint and agility times. They also show an increase in running economy and performance. But the right exercises are needed in order for this to be effective. When incorporating plyometrics into your workout routine, be sure to do them at the beginning of a strength-training day, before a run, or on it’s own for a quick power session. Then give yourself a 2 to 3 days break from plyos. Try this routine (do 3 sets of each exercise):

  • Depth jumps. Stand on a raised platform, such as a box or bench, toes on the edge. Step out and drop straight down (don’t jump). When you land, immediately jump straight up. Land softly. Do 6 to 8 reps.
  • Hurdle hops. Set up four to six 10 to 12 inch hurdles in a straight line, one in front of the other. Leave about 3 feet of space between each. Lower into a quarter-squat and explosively jump over each hurdle, making minimal contact with the ground and moving as fast as possible. Do 4 to 6 reps. To increase difficulty, move the hurdles either closer together or further apart. Change is up by not putting them in a straight line and incorporating lateral hops as well.
  • Depth jump into med-ball throw. Stand at the edge of a raised platform, holding a medicine ball with an underhand grip. Step off the platform and drop straight down. As soon as your feet hit the floor, jump up and throw the ball as high and far behind you as possible. Do 6 to 8 reps. Try not to throw the ball at anyone nearby.
  • Ankle jumps. Stand tall with both feet together. Bend knees slightly and jump straight up. While in the air, pull your toes toward your shins, emphasizing flexion at the ankle joint. You won’t jump very high, due to limited knee involvement. Do 6 to 8 reps.
  • Running leaps. From standing, take a few approach steps, keeping your body as low as possible, then leap off your left leg. Land on right leg and immediately push off again as quickly as possible (it should look like an exaggerated running form). That’s 1 rep. Do 6 to 8 reps.

Do you incorporate plyometrics in your workouts?

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Find your power: get explosive by adding plyometrics was originally published on Self Evolve

Stronger arms, more speed

Are you trying to run faster? To be honest, runners aren’t necessarily known for their arms. It’s easy to neglect your top half when it seems like your legs do all the work. Failing to train your upper body, however, can hold you back big time. It may seem strange, but a strong upper body…

Stronger arms, more speed was originally published on Self Evolve

Are you trying to run faster?

To be honest, runners aren’t necessarily known for their arms. It’s easy to neglect your top half when it seems like your legs do all the work. Failing to train your upper body, however, can hold you back big time. It may seem strange, but a strong upper body is just as important as trained legs to run fast and easy. With stronger arms comes a faster running pace.

Stronger arms will pump your way to faster running

stronger arms

“Have you ever tried to run without your arms? It’s weird, inefficient, and hard as hell. Arm drive is a big part of running– when your legs get tired, you use your arms more because of the kinetic chain; you can’t have one without the other.” – Pamela Geisel, exercise physiologist.

Building a strong upper body will help you maintain good form as the miles tick by. Also, that stable, upright posture can increase your endurance by improving your lung capacity. In addition, your oxygen requirement will be reduced, leading to faster runs while using the same amount of energy.

Avoid injury

Not only will you run faster you’ll also prevent injury and create bone density while building muscular strength. And don’t go for the light weights, you have to be willing to lift heavier things if you want to prevent injury, improve your speed and last longer while running. Lifting light weights for a high number of reps achieves the same goal as running- building endurance, not strength.

Most runners skip the weights since they feel like they don’t have time, but it’s easy to break it into 10 minute increments. Taking 10 minutes off the duration of your run and doing a quick strength set provides more benefits than 10 more minutes on the road.

Is your goal to PR?

If so, save the hard-core lifting for cross-training days so you can focus on getting in a quality, high-intensity run. Otherwise, schedule a short circuit of strength training exercises pre-run: A study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that doing so can make you more likely to bust out extra reps and help you maintain proper form throughout. And if the weight room is intimidating, body weight can be more than enough. i.e. push-ups and TRX rows. Whatever you do, be sure to warm up with core exercises such as planks and side planks.

Do you workout your arms?

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Stronger arms, more speed was originally published on Self Evolve

Chicago Marathon 2017: clothing

What did I wear while running the marathon and why? How did I figure out the best clothes to wear while running for 5+ hours? How did I avoid chafing and blisters (well, for the most part). Continue reading for the answers and more. 🙂 When I first started running, I just wore whatever exercise…

Chicago Marathon 2017: clothing and accessories was originally published on Self Evolve

What did I wear while running the marathon and why? How did I figure out the best clothes to wear while running for 5+ hours? How did I avoid chafing and blisters (well, for the most part). Continue reading for the answers and more. 🙂 When I first started running, I just wore whatever exercise…

Chicago Marathon 2017: clothing was originally published on Self Evolve