What fuels Shalane Flanagan: eat to run fast

What fuels you to run fast? Everyday we are faced with the age-old question: what do you want to eat? Many couples and families alike struggle to find the answer to this question but most people tend to try to eat healthy. But what is healthy? Everyone is different, but today I’m going to focus…

What fuels Shalane Flanagan: eat to run fast was originally published on Self Evolve

Advertisements

What fuels you to run fast?

Everyday we are faced with the age-old question: what do you want to eat? Many couples and families alike struggle to find the answer to this question but most people tend to try to eat healthy. But what is healthy? Everyone is different, but today I’m going to focus on the super fast marathon runners and what they eat to fly. With the Chicago Marathon 2018 coming up, I feel it’s fitting to share a few recipes from a new cookbook coming out August 4th from NYC Marathon winner Shalane Flanagan. Read on in order to run fast.

Thai Quinoa Salad

This is a great healthy version of the beloved Thai salad. It’s hearty with quinoa, and you can add in fresh grilled steak. It had the complex carbohydrates needed to full you prior to race day. Full recipe can be found here.

Turkey Trot Meatballs

run fastEasy to make and packed full of protein, these turkey meatballs are the way to go. You can make a lot of them and have them around for awhile. You can dress them up or down. Add them to your salad or in rice bowls. Full recipe can be found here.

Red raspberry beet smoothie bowl

This is a great option for pre and post-run. Beets are good for your cardiovascular system since they lower blood pressure. Oats are a great option for easy-to-digest carbohydrates that provide energy for running. Full recipe can be found here.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups

Reese’s are delicious but unfortunately full of sugar and hydrogenated oils, which are really bad for you. These are just as rich but you can feel good about eating them. They use coconut oil, peanut butter, cocoa powder, and maple syrup for the main ingredients. All whole foods, good fats, and natural sweeteners. Store these in the freezer for a yummy cold treat. Full recipe can be found here.

Pre-order the cookbook today!

 

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “run fast cook fast”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “400a73f47385660c57f55794b508d275”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

What fuels Shalane Flanagan: eat to run fast was originally published on Self Evolve

Smiling can impact your running

Training your facial muscles can affect your results Last year, Eliud Kipchoge ran 26.2 miles in just two hours and 25 seconds in Monza, Italy, as part of Nike’s Breaking2 Project. His time, although not record-eligible, is the fastest marathon time ever recorded, and the effort required to clock it was undoubtedly grueling. Yet Kipchoge…

Smiling can impact your running was originally published on Self Evolve

Training your facial muscles can affect your results

Last year, Eliud Kipchoge ran 26.2 miles in just two hours and 25 seconds in Monza, Italy, as part of Nike’s Breaking2 Project. His time, although not record-eligible, is the fastest marathon time ever recorded, and the effort required to clock it was undoubtedly grueling. Yet Kipchoge never let it show on his face. In fact, it appeared as if he was actually grinning at times. He later told reporters that he was smiling in order to relax and work through the pain. While it may seem silly, science backs up the fact that smiling does have an effect on our performance.

Smile to run further

Studies have shown that when we enrich our workout with a smile, we feel that the effort we put out is far less than the effort we exert when we frown while exercising. But no research had seriously looked into the effects of manipulating our facial expressions by smiling or frowning on our running economy until now. Researchers at Ulster University in Northern Ireland and Swansea University in Wales asked a group of 24 runners to wear a breathing mask to measure oxygen consumption and then complete four six-minute running blocks on a treadmill while smiling and while frowning. The study found that runners who smiled used less oxygen, ran more economically, and had a lowered perceived rate of exertion than those who frowned and those in the control group.

“They were 2.8 percent more economical when smiling than when frowning,” says Noel Brick, Ph. D., lecturer in sport and exercise physiology at the University of Ulster and coauthor of the study. The reason has to do with facial feedback. This little trick becomes especially useful for runners who need to conserve energy over the course of a long-distance run. When talking marathon distance, you can easily shave 5 minutes off your finish time just by smiling. And that smile doesn’t even have to be genuine. Fake it till you make it!

Throw your brain an endorphins party

A smile instantly boosts positivity, relaxes the body, and in turn, makes you more self-aware. When it comes to running, mentality and self-awareness will take you a long way – literally. In the end, mustering up a smile even when you don’t feel like it is just a matter of training, like any other habit. Besides, there’s not much to lose by giving grinning a shot. If nothing else, at least you’ll end up with better race photos.

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “running economy”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “6a8c0d8ad97e7db9ea81fb22d32295fd”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

Smiling can impact your running was originally published on Self Evolve

How to hone your hydration

Now that it’s getting hotter.. As a runner, it’s easy to think just drink more water to stay hydrated when it gets hot outside. But, it’s a little more complicated than just drinking more water. Even pro runners who have a team of experts dialing in their every need struggle with hydration. You have to…

How to hone your hydration was originally published on Self Evolve

Now that it’s getting hotter..

As a runner, it’s easy to think just drink more water to stay hydrated when it gets hot outside. But, it’s a little more complicated than just drinking more water. Even pro runners who have a team of experts dialing in their every need struggle with hydration. You have to factor in heat, humidity, acclimation, altitude, intensity level, and how much you drank before you ran, in addition to your individual sweat rate. Everyone’s needs are different.

Hydration status

Sweat reduces your blood volume, which means your heart is working harder. Becoming dehydrated by 2 to 3 percent will slow you down, and anything over 4 percent could land you in a medical tent. The easiest way to determine whether you’re dehydrated is with a pee test,. Pale yellow is where you want to be. This test should be done before you run. But if you’re training for a half marathon or longer, an additional step is required. You should calculate your sweat rate by doing the following: weigh yourself before and after an easy hour-long run in which you don’t drink any fluids. Every pound you lose is equivalent to 16 ounces of liquid you need to replace. So if you lose two pounds during an hour-long run, drink 32 to 48 ounces of liquids in the two to four hours after to replenish. 

Don’t rely on thirst

Thirst isn’t a good indication of your fluid loss because as soon as you drink, nerve endings in your tongue and throat send sensory signals to your brain to reduce your thirst before your body has absorbed enough water. It’s best to plan your hydration ahead of time.

  • Running up to 60 minutes: drink water. Aim to drink 3 to 6 ounces of water every 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Running 60 to 90 minutes in hot and humid conditions: drink water and electrolytes. It’s recommended to start with 750 mg of sodium per one liter (32 ounces). 
  • Running 90 to 120+ minutes: drink water, electrolytes and eat carbs. For workouts up to 150 minutes (2.5 hours) it’s recommended to take up to 60 grams of carbs per hour. For long runs over 2.5 hours, up it to 90 grams of carbs.

Keep in mind electrolytes become even more important for performance in three to four hours of continuous exercise. Also, pay attention to the heat and humidity index as that will affect your hydration levels as well.

 

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “electrolytes”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “6a8c0d8ad97e7db9ea81fb22d32295fd”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

How to hone your hydration was originally published on Self Evolve

The sensory run: tune into your body

Is your running routine getting stale? If you’re anything like me, you plug in your headphones and start up the running watch before even starting your run. My favorite music to jam to while running tends to be either Hamilton or the Kendrick Lamar/Black Panther mix radio station on Pandora. While the music helps me…

The sensory run: tune into your body was originally published on Self Evolve

Is your running routine getting stale?

If you’re anything like me, you plug in your headphones and start up the running watch before even starting your run. My favorite music to jam to while running tends to be either Hamilton or the Kendrick Lamar/Black Panther mix radio station on Pandora. While the music helps me keep pace, over time my routine feels more like a routine and I don’t always get that runner’s high feeling that I love so much. A “sensory run” can help combat that boring feeling. I’m talking no music, no phone, no technology. While this may seem barbaric, these runs can make you a better athlete.

Tuning in to your body

In order to reach a zen-like state, we have to tune into our senses according to Christina Heilman, Ph. D., certified strength and conditioning coach in Driggs, Idaho. A sensory run is one in which you let go of your mind and focus on what’s going on inside and around you through the five main senses: sight, smell, taste, hearing and touch. Doing this allows you to be truly present and helps you tune into what your body needs in that moment. This sensory-focused approach can help you push your performance to the next level. Research shows that elite athletes use sensations such as hydration, muscle pain, and fatigue as well as their surroundings to optimize their runs.

The more you practice turning inward, the better you’ll know your body. With this, you’ll tolerate discomfort more effectively and your time will be more enjoyable. Since technology such as phones, watches and apps can cause us to tune out, you’ll find turning inward is easier without any gadgets. But don’t toss all your toys! The goal of a sensory run is to find time for tech-free miles about once a week. To improve your understanding of your own body while running, Jeffrey Brown suggests cycling through your five senses, focusing on a different one every five minutes.

Senses to focus on

  • Sight: Taking in your visual surroundings will help you focus on rewarding details of interest and increase your enjoyment. To use your sight to your advantage, try to spot landmarks ahead and then speed up to chase them down. Or choose external benchmarks like the next hill to focus on your form and complete sub-goals.
  • Smell: Smell is one of the senses most associated with emotional memories, which is why you may recall the salty notes of the ocean air during a run on Nantucket. For performance’s sake, concentrate on smells that may be present along the course you’re training for. For example, zero in on the smell of fresh-cut grass during your training if your race is taking place in a park. This allows you to quickly acclimate to the race setting so you can devote more concentration to actually running.
  • Taste: Tastes that are experienced while running can act as a gauge for a runner’s physiological status. Dehydration, for example, can cause saliva to thicken and become more concentrated with salt. If you find your mouth tastes salty, see it as a signal to take care of yourself. Stop at a water station mid-race, find a water fountain during a run, or simply turn back for home to get some water.
  • Hearing: No matter where you run, tuning into the sounds around you can enhance awareness. You’ll know when a truck is roaring up the road or if a competitor is about to pass you in a race. During training runs, seeking out sounds you’ve never heard before and trying to find out where they’re coming from forces you to be engaged in the moment and increases enjoyment and reward.
  • Touch: Summer runs often equal sweaty runs, but pay attention to how that sweat feels on your skin. If you feel gritty, that’s a sign that you lost electrolytes like sodium in your sweat. If you feel salt flakes or crystals when you touch your skin postrun, take in sodium an hour before your next run by eating something salty or adding electrolyte mix to your water. This will help your body retain water and prevent muscle cramps.

Do you take time for a sensory run?

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “sensory run”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “6a8c0d8ad97e7db9ea81fb22d32295fd”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

The sensory run: tune into your body was originally published on Self Evolve

Sticky notes: Shin splints and KT tape

Known running fact Shin splints suck. Less known? Kinesiology tape can make them suck less. Not only can I attest for this from my Chicago Marathon 2017 training, a new study published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness agrees. People who wore KT tape for just a week experienced less pain than those who…

Sticky notes: Shin splints and KT tape was originally published on Self Evolve

Known running fact

Shin splints suck. Less known? Kinesiology tape can make them suck less. Not only can I attest for this from my Chicago Marathon 2017 training, a new study published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness agrees. People who wore KT tape for just a week experienced less pain than those who used shoe insoles. This is huge when shin splints make up 13 percent of all running injuries.

What are shin splints

Shin splints happen when you overload the muscles in the front of your shin, causing inflammation in the muscle, tendon and bone. KT tape lifts the superficial tissues, which promotes healing by moving waste products out of the area. It also stimulates nerve endings that relax the muscle. The best part is the tape is elastic and allows normal movement patterns, so you can continue running at least some of those training miles. I recommend cutting your miles in half, since shin splints are often caused by going too hard or too far without building up to it. They respond well to rest, so if they still are just as painful after a rest period (i.e. a week or two), be sure to go to the doctor to rule out a stress fracture.

My favorite KT tape

This KT Tape is a life saver. I found it to be the least expensive on Amazon and ended up going through almost two rolls during marathon training last year. What brand of KT tape do you like?

 

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “kt tape”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “5717135fa8463818355cdea45245d180”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

Sticky notes: Shin splints and KT tape was originally published on Self Evolve

Running therapy: lace up to boost mental health

Running affects your mood Do you lace up to feel better? Studies show that aerobic exercise can be as effective as antidepressants in treating mild to moderate depression. Not to mention, with side effects such as improved health and weight management rather than the bloating and sexual dysfunction associated with pharmaceuticals. Running therapy is the…

Running therapy: lace up to boost mental health was originally published on Self Evolve

Running affects your mood

running therapyDo you lace up to feel better? Studies show that aerobic exercise can be as effective as antidepressants in treating mild to moderate depression. Not to mention, with side effects such as improved health and weight management rather than the bloating and sexual dysfunction associated with pharmaceuticals. Running therapy is the first-line treatment for depression in Australia, the UK, and the Netherlands. The US is a little slower on updating their guidelines. How does moving the body change the mind? It’s actually more than just endorphins. The emerging view of running’s ability to improve mental health also takes into account long-term structural changes in the brain as well as subjective states like mood and cognition. Science continues working to explain the theory behind what we runners already know from practice.

Running changes how you think

In any one year, about 10 percent of the US population would meet the diagnostic criteria for depression, and about 20 percent for anxiety. The incidence of these conditions in runners is likely similar. A 2017 review of research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found no difference in depressive symptoms between what researchers called “high-performance athletes” and non-athletes. All levels of runners are affected. But running helps you think and process things differently. It helps you think objectively. For me, it helps me realize that things I think are a huge deal aren’t in the scheme of things. When you focus on accomplishing a task like a 4 mile run, it kicks off a positive feedback loop that continues throughout the run and takes our thinking and emotions out of the trench of negativity.

Running therapy for everyone

You don’t have to be an ultra-marathoner to get the benefits of running. But research does show an added benefit to those who regularly run and/or exercise. The mood improvement and energy boost is higher for those who normally workout. This is because runners can hold a good pace for a long time without going anaerobic, allowing for the physiological processes that lead to improved mood, according to Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Ph. D., a professor at Iowa State University who is a leading figure in the field of exercise physiology. “If you’re a regular runner, you have the cardiorespiratory fitness to sustain an exercise intensity that’s associated with a feel-better effect.” Anyone can become a regular runner by simply adding in running or cardio workouts three times a week.

Do you run? Does it help you feel better?

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “running therapy”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “5717135fa8463818355cdea45245d180”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

Running therapy: lace up to boost mental health was originally published on Self Evolve

Find your power: get explosive by adding plyometrics

Get plyometric! Jumping isn’t only for basketball players. The right explosive exercises can help make your next run feel lighter and faster than ever. Most runners think about speed work, hills, and strength training to improve their run times, but often overlook adding power. Adding plyometrics- explosive, energy-honing exercises- to your training can make your…

Find your power: get explosive by adding plyometrics was originally published on Self Evolve

Get plyometric!

Jumping isn’t only for basketball players. The right explosive exercises can help make your next run feel lighter and faster than ever. Most runners think about speed work, hills, and strength training to improve their run times, but often overlook adding power. Adding plyometrics- explosive, energy-honing exercises- to your training can make your usual miles feel like you’ve switched to warp-speed mode. Plyometrics help convert strength into speed and explosive power.

What is it?

“Plyometrics involve a fast, high-intensity, involuntary eccentric contraction of the muscles and tendons, followed by an immediate, powerful concentric contraction,” Adam Rosante, strength and performance coach and founder of the Montauk Barbell Club. There are a lot of exercises that may look plyometric (i.e. box jumps, squat jumps, jumping lunges) but don’t fit the true definition. In order for it to be considered plyo, it has to be executed in less than two-tenths of a second. This is the amount of time in which your body can experience the shock that elicits the involuntary stretch, and use the accumulated energy for the returned action. The key to doing this well is a small number of good reps.

Slash seconds off your time

Studies show that just a month of performing traditional, resistance, or assisted plyo programs two to three times a week cuts seconds off sprint and agility times. They also show an increase in running economy and performance. But the right exercises are needed in order for this to be effective. When incorporating plyometrics into your workout routine, be sure to do them at the beginning of a strength-training day, before a run, or on it’s own for a quick power session. Then give yourself a 2 to 3 days break from plyos. Try this routine (do 3 sets of each exercise):

  • Depth jumps. Stand on a raised platform, such as a box or bench, toes on the edge. Step out and drop straight down (don’t jump). When you land, immediately jump straight up. Land softly. Do 6 to 8 reps.
  • Hurdle hops. Set up four to six 10 to 12 inch hurdles in a straight line, one in front of the other. Leave about 3 feet of space between each. Lower into a quarter-squat and explosively jump over each hurdle, making minimal contact with the ground and moving as fast as possible. Do 4 to 6 reps. To increase difficulty, move the hurdles either closer together or further apart. Change is up by not putting them in a straight line and incorporating lateral hops as well.
  • Depth jump into med-ball throw. Stand at the edge of a raised platform, holding a medicine ball with an underhand grip. Step off the platform and drop straight down. As soon as your feet hit the floor, jump up and throw the ball as high and far behind you as possible. Do 6 to 8 reps. Try not to throw the ball at anyone nearby.
  • Ankle jumps. Stand tall with both feet together. Bend knees slightly and jump straight up. While in the air, pull your toes toward your shins, emphasizing flexion at the ankle joint. You won’t jump very high, due to limited knee involvement. Do 6 to 8 reps.
  • Running leaps. From standing, take a few approach steps, keeping your body as low as possible, then leap off your left leg. Land on right leg and immediately push off again as quickly as possible (it should look like an exaggerated running form). That’s 1 rep. Do 6 to 8 reps.

Do you incorporate plyometrics in your workouts?

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “tanoshii6603-20”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar_position = “bottom”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “search”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “Shop Related Products”;
amzn_assoc_default_search_phrase = “plyometrics”;
amzn_assoc_default_category = “All”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “5717135fa8463818355cdea45245d180”;

//z-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/onejs?MarketPlace=US

Find your power: get explosive by adding plyometrics was originally published on Self Evolve